NEWS OF INTEREST

Martian Dust Storm Alert

(September 28, 2022) The ALPO Mars Observing Section has verified the occurrence of new dust clouds that originated in the equatorial regions of Mars from 20° degrees west longitude to 70° west longitude.

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Clouds then spread southward toward the south polar regions and northward to about +30° latitude.

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It will be interesting to observe if there is further expansion of these clouds. We also need to see if new core dust clouds develop in other areas of Mars. If this happens, it could lead to planet-wide storms.

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Many observations will help in the understanding of global wind patterns on Mars. Please send all observations – written descriptions, sketches/drawings and images – to either of the following:

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Autumn 2022 ALPO Journal Now Available!

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(September 22, 2022) We are pleased to announce the release of the Autumn 2022 issue (DJALPO64-4) of the Journal of the Assn of Lunar & Planetary Observers, as usual jam-packed with useful info for the serious solar system observer. As is our usual practice, this issue is available to only ALPO members via a special download link emailed to them recently. To join the ALPO yourself (starting dues are only $18!) so you also can gain access to our latest Journal, contact Matt Will at matt.will@alpo-astronomy.org

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In this issue, you’ll find:
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These reports and those who produce and contribute to them are what make our organization so vital to observational solar system astronomy. We are extremely proud of the work they do.
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Use the various e-mail addresses and hyperlinks (in blue text) throughout this issue to instantly e-mail authors and ALPO staff members PLUS use the built-in bookmarks to jump to various papers and presentations within the Journal.

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Urgent Request for Venus Observations and Images

The newly discovered Cloud Discontinuity phenomenon was observed during the last few weeks by amateur astronomers António Cidadão in Portugal, Luigi Morrone in Italy, and Clyde Foster in South Africa, who have been contributing their observations to the ALPO Venus Section from 2022 May 15 through 25. An example of their observations accompanies this alert.

The presence of the curious cloud discontinuity has been captured in their images. It is expected that the next observations of this phenomenon will occur again starting 2022 May 30 and about every 5 days afterwards.

It will be important to determine when it will dissipate, so imaging with IR wavelength filters are needed. It is critically important to observe every possible day in order to cover the global situation of the middle level Venusian clouds.

Imaging in UV may be useful in confirming whether this wave dissipates before arriving at the cloud tops of the planet.

Observations should be sent without delay to the ALPO Venus Section at Venus@alpo-astronomy.org

Important links with detailed background on the Venus Cloud Discontinuity are listed below for further information:

https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4433/13/2/348


https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2020GL087221


Spring 2022 ALPO Journal Available to ALL!

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(March 16, 2022) We are pleased to announce the release of the Spring 2022 issue (DJALPO64-2) of the Journal of the Assn of Lunar & Planetary Observers, as usual jam-packed with useful info for the serious solar system observer. Normally, only ALPO members have access to the latest four issues of our Journal. But with this issue being so special with material relating to our 75th anniversary, all are invited to download it.
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To do so, click here.
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In this issue, you’ll find:
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These reports and those who produce and contribute to them are what make our organization so vital to observational solar system astronomy. We are extremely proud of the work they do.
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Use the various e-mail addresses and hyperlinks (in blue text) throughout this issue to instantly e-mail authors and ALPO staff members PLUS use the built-in bookmarks to jump to various papers and presentations within the Journal.
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For information on becoming an ALPO member, please contact the ALPO membership secretary at matt.will@alpo-astronomy.org
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Please patronize the good folks who advertise in our Journal in return for their support of us:

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The ALPO YouTube Channel is Now Alive!

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July 10, 2020 — In another effort to expand our online presence, ALPO Podcast Coordinator Tim Robertson has started an ALPO YouTube channel. While it’s still new, here you will find videos and content — including live streaming of events and tutorials — that support the mission of this organization. To learn more about the ALPO on our YouTube channel, click on the ALPO YouTube Channel link in the upper corner of the right  sidebar on this screen.

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Publications Section Bulletin

Are you looking to see if the ALPO ever covered a special solar system event that you remember? Does your current research require specific solar system observational data by the amateur astronomy community? Click Here to go to JALPO Indexes

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Privacy Policy

Because you have the ability to order merchandise from an advertiser with a link on the ALPO website, we want you to know that your privacy is important to us. Click here for the text of our entire privacy statement.

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ALPO 2021 Conference News
By Tim Robertson & Ken Poshedly,
ALPO Conference coordinators

Overview
Due to the continuing nearly worldwide quarantining caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, the 2021 Conference of the ALPO will be held online on Friday and Saturday, August 13 and 14. (This is to prevent a scheduling conflict with the 2021 Astronomical League Convention (ALCON 2021) which will be held in Albuquerque, NM, on August 4 thru 7, 2021.)
The ALPO conference times will be:
Friday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern Time (10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Pacific Time)
Saturday from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern Time (10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Pacific Time).
The ALPO Conference is free and open to all via two different streaming methods:
The free online conferencing software application, Zoom.
On the ALPO YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEmixiL-d5k2Fx27Ijfk41A
Those who plan to present astronomy papers or presentations must (1) already be members of the ALPO, (2) use Zoom, and (3) have it already installed on their computer prior to the conference dates. Zoom is free and available at https://zoom.us/
Those who have not yet joined the ALPO may do so online, so as to qualify to present their work at this conference. Digital ALPO memberships start at only $18 a year. To join online, go to http://www.astroleague.org/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=10&products_id=39, then scroll to the bottom of that page, select your membership type, click on “Add to Cart” and proceed from there.
There will be different Zoom meeting hyperlinks to access the conference each of the two days of the conference. Both links will be posted on social media and e-mailed to those who wish to receive it that way on Thursday, August 12, 2021. The Zoom virtual (online) “meeting room” will open 15 minutes prior to the beginning of each day’s activities.
Those individuals wishing to attend via Zoom should contact Tim Robertson at cometman@cometman.net as soon as possible.
Agenda
The conference will consist of initial welcoming remarks and general announcements at the beginning each day, followed by papers and research findings on astronomy-related topics presented by ALPO members.
Following a break after the last astronomy talk on Saturday will be presentations of the Walter Haas Observing Award, the Peggy Haas Service Award and the Michael D. Reynolds Astronomy Award. The last one is brand new and was presented to Ms. Pranvera Hyseni several months ago in recognition for her work over the past several years to advance the public’s awareness and appreciation of astronomy.
A keynote speaker will then follow the awards presentations on Saturday. The selection of a keynote speaker is in progress and the final decision will be announced in the summer issue of this Journal (JALPO63-3).
Presentation Guidelines
All presentations should be no more than 15 minutes in length; the preferred method is 12 minutes for the presentation itself plus 3 minutes for follow-up questions. The preferred format is Microsoft PowerPoint.
Send all PowerPoint files of the presentations to Tim Robertson at cometman@cometman.net .
Suggested Topics
Participants are encouraged to present research papers and experience reports concerning various aspects of Earth-based observational astronomy including the following.
New or ongoing observing programs and studies, specifically, how those programs were designed, implemented and continue to function.
Results of personal or group studies of solar system or extra-solar system bodies.
New or ongoing activities involving astronomical instrumentation, construction or improvement.
Challenges faced by Earth-based observers such as changing interest levels, deteriorating observing conditions brought about by possible global warming, etc.
Information about paper presentations, the keynote speaker and other conference data will be published in this Journal and online as details are learned.